Course notes:

The use of information technology in education has been influenced by several learning theories, including behavioural learning theory, social learning theory and cognitive learning theory, and thus has roots in the work of Dewey (1938) and Vygotsky (1978). Similarly to other media, students are influenced by’ “perceived ease of use”, “perceived usefulness”, “attitude toward use”, and “intention to use.”

Culturally, not everyone will be in agreement with the use of DGBL and one way of keeping colleagues onside is to ensure that they can engage with your communications and resources without radical change to their day to day activities. It is unwise to put documentation inside a game that colleagues or students could access more easily in it.

Games in general, and educational games in particular, pose unique requirements on the perception and processing of information by gamers/learners. Some of the attractions of the different types of games—for example, the immersive nature of the environment, the discover-type nature of game-play, or the strong emotional impact that games can have—all pose requirements on learners’ cognition. An understanding of the way we process information in learning and performance is critical in order to leverage the game paradigm for educational purposes. The game paradigm that is most appealing to educators is that the educational content can be presented in an integrated, systems-based form rather than in isolation and disconnected from contextual information.

Reading: Van Merriënboer, J. J. G., & Sweller, J. (2005). Cognitive load theory and complex learning: Recent developments and future directions. Educational Psychology Review, 17(2), 147–177. doi:10.1007/s10648-005-3951-0 http://www.igi-global.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/gateway/chapter/full-text-html/20116

Returning to the work of (Brom et al., 2009) providing support for teachers using the game should be included in DGBL approaches. This might be in the form of a wiki, for example the Minecraft in School wiki, or a more broad approach using a learning management system to support a whole course. If students are involved in game design, then the supporting information and technologies should reflect the game industry and enable

  • team-work;
  • time management;
  • communication (oral, written and electronic);
  • data collection, review and synopsis; and
  • computing.

Other useful resources for students:  short video tutorials, assembled as playlists to allow students to engage and re-engage with the story.

Games Ed in the UK provides a detailed website to engage teachers in DGBL. Note that this approach is not purely academic, but addresses some of the social and cultural barriers that have been identified by scholars researching and delivering DGBL (de Freitas, Ott, Popescu, & Stanescu, 2013; Devore, 2006; Dovey, 2006; Drotner & Livingstone, 2008).

Reading

2011 Innovating with technology: Games-based learning research trials

https://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/researchinnovation/findingsreport.pdf

This report is worth browsing, or reading in detail. It gives some insight into large scale research and support for game based learning in Victoria.

Personal Reflection: Discussion Forum: Game-based learning in our education community

Now you have spent time considering design of GLB, what strategies interest you in allowing you to capture information about the learning and teaching process? What have you tried? Or what factors in your education community and/or the design of game would facilitate success?

As a teacher librarian, I am particularly interested in strategies that will enhance information and digital literacies. Like other colleagues here, I have been able to try digital games within my information literacy sessions without the support of other staff. However, by using games such as Kahoot, I have also excited other teachers about the possibilities of GBL. I am certainly going to return to Brom et.al., (2009) to provide a framework for student work. A major consideration for my teaching practice is time management – both for myself and students, considering the short sessions that I have available. However, even now I am thinking of possibilities that may counter that limitation. I certainly will be considering how to move forward with DGBL.

  • team-work;
  • time management;
  • communication (oral, written and electronic);
  • data collection, review and synopsis; and
  • computing.

Reference:

Brom, C., Šisler, V., & Slavík, R. (2010). Implementing digital game-based learning in schools: augmented learning environment of ‘Europe 2045. Multimedia Systems, 16(1), 23-41.

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